What to Do with Your Dog on Vacation

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You don’t have to leave your dog behind when you go on vacation. Here are some of the best ways to make your dog a part of your next excursion.

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1. Find dog-friendly accommodation

The first order of business if you are taking your dog on vacation with you is to find a place for him to stay. There are tons of hotels and other kinds of accommodation that accept dogs on the premises these days. You just have to know where to look. There are a few different services you can use to find dog friendly locations on the way to and at your destination. Be sure to plan ahead, especially for overnight stays. Not all places will take dogs, and you may need to find an overnight shelter or some other accommodation for those areas of the country where it is tougher to find an accommodating hotel.

2. Microchip your dog

If you are travelling with your dog, there is a risk that you two will get separated. You could lose your dog in an unfamiliar place, and it will be much easier to find him again if you have had him microchipped and use sites like PawMaw. Microchipping is a simple and harmless procedure that you can have done at most veterinarian offices. It will help you to locate your dog and give you peace of mind as you travel.

3. Prepare your dog for the journey

If your dog isn’t used to long car rides, then you will want to plan ahead and get him used to riding in the car with some shorter trips. See how he does and determine ahead of time if you need to bring a sedative or not. If you do, just talk to your vet about which sedative to use to help your dog sleep through the car rides and be rested for when you make a stop.

You’ll also want to ensure that your dog is up to date on all of his medications for the trip, so check with your vet about any shots that may be necessary for a long trip.

4. Find the right carrier

If you are travelling by plane, then you want a good quality carrier for your dog. Be sure to pick something that is the right size, that is secure enough and that will be comfortable for your dog for long periods of time. You’ll also want to make sure the carrier is approved for use on airlines, so you can read the handy guide here that covers that information.

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5. Pack everything your dog will need

You should give yourself plenty of time to plan ahead and make a list of things that your dog will need for the trip. Don’t wait until the last minute to figure out what to pack for your dog, as you might forget something important. Instead, start writing out your list days or even weeks in advance. This gives you time to remember everything and to buy the items you may be missing.

Be sure to pack enough food and extra water for your dog, as well as any medications, toys and bedding he will need. You may also want to invest in a dog bike trailer, allowing him to have his own space as you travel. That’s a good option when you have little space in your car or your dog is prone to making a mess when travelling.

Photo by Micaela Parente on Unsplash

6. Plan some stops for your dog

Your dog may need regular stops to do his business as well as to run around and get some fresh air and exercise. You may even want to make some special stops that are all about your dog’s happiness, such as a dog park or a creek where your dog can cool off and go for a swim. These don’t have to be long stops, but giving your dog some space to run around and enjoy himself can be great for his mental wellbeing and ensure he will enjoy the trip more.

Final Thoughts

Your dog can be an important part of your vacation plans, and he doesn’t have to be left out when you go somewhere. Just make the right accommodations for him and plan ahead to ensure that he enjoys himself and can be with you wherever you go.

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